Dawson County Commissioners Hope To Fill Highway Supt. Opening Soon

The Dawson County Commissioners met for their final regular meeting of 2016 on Friday, December 30, 2016. Commissioners Butch Hagan, Dean Kugler and Bill Stewart were present. Commissioners PJ Jacobson and Dennis Rickertsen were absent.
Treasurer’s Receipts for $535,096.95 were approved as submitted. Also approved were Claims in the amount of $1,012,940.78.
Under Committee Reports, Chairman Hagan reported that the Ag Society has not yet heard anything concerning their grant request. He also reported that he had attended the NACO annual conference and visited with numerous highway superintendents from across the state. They suggested that Dawson County put the ad for the highway superintendent opening on their website.
The commissioners authorized Chairman Hagan to sign the addendum to the SCALES interlocal agreement that adds Clay County.
Approval was also given for the contract modification price increase for Paulsen Inc. to include four miles south of Gothenburg that were omitted from the original list. This brings the total bid price for the project to $3,000,000. Chairman Hagan signed the contract.
A resolution concerning the agreement with the State of Nebraska, the Department of Roads and the Union Pacific Railroad for the Cozad Southeast UPRR Crossing located on County Road 424 southeast of Cozad was also approved.  The UP Railroad pays for the crossing and the county is responsible for signage and markings.
Discussion continued on the Employee Health Wellness premium policy.
The Dawson County Board of Equalization met prior to the Dawson County Commissioners meeting. Requests for tax corrections were granted to Pentad Properties Corp for two parcels, Noe Gomez, Cory Urban, N McDermott, Wycoff Farms LLC, Paulsen Inc. for personal property and Lexington Golf Club for personal property.
The next regular meeting for the commissionrs is scheduled for Friday, January 13th.

Swede City's First Born of 2017:

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Lexington's First Baby of 2017:

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Souper Bowl Cookoff To Be Held In Cozad

The Grand Generation Center is excited about their upcoming Souper Bowl Cookoff that will be held on Friday,  January 27th. 
The Cookoff event invites all levels of soup chefs and it will be held from 5:30-7 p.m. Hungry patrons are encouragaged to attend with the meal costing $5. The meal consists of samples of all the soups, a full bowl of soup, a piece of pie and an ice cream sundae bar along with one vote to select your favorite. 
Extra votes can be purchased for $1 each  and stuffing the ballot box is encouraged. All proceeds go to the Grand Generation Center.

State of Nebraka Kicks Off Sesquicentennial Celebration

Nebraska Governor Pete Ricketts and First Lady Susanne Shore launched the Nebraska150 Celebration by unveiling four online programs focused on fitness, volunteerism, education, and collecting the histories of Nebraskans.  The yearlong celebration begins January 1st, 2017 and will feature a total of 13 signature programs and events sponsored by the Nebraska150 Celebration.
“Nebraska’s 150th birthday celebration is right around the corner,” said Governor Ricketts.  “Today we are debuting four online programs that will help Nebraskans across the state come together to celebrate how much the Good Life has grown over the last century and a half.  Susanne and I invite our fellow Nebraskans to join our family in participating in these challenges and activities.”
“In developing programming for this celebration, we focused on projects that would bridge communities, connect Nebraskans, and enhance state pride,” said First Lady Shore.  “We also wanted to create something meaningful that would live beyond 2017 so we are partnering with organizations that can lend their expertise and can carry on the programs.”
The four programs kicking off the sesquicentennial celebration include the Nebraska Impact Initiative, the Nebraska150 Challenge, Now You Know Nebraska, and I Am Nebraska.
The Nebraska Impact Initiative
The Nebraska Impact Initiative challenges Nebraskans to volunteer 150 hours or more either as an individual or as part of a group in 2017.  Utilizing an online platform at www.nebraskaimpact.com, the initiative allows participants to register, discover volunteer opportunities, connect with other Nebraskans, and track progress. Through the website and social media, the Nebraska150 Celebration will recognize Nebraskans who participate and highlight communities, schools and non-profit organizations that are impacted.
Shore said, “Nebraska consistently ranks in the top 10 nationally for volunteerism.  What better way to celebrate our 150th birthday than to be number one in 2017?  Everyone can play a role and help to build better communities while connecting with friends through Nebraska Impact.”
ServeNebraska Executive Director Cathy Plager said, “In 2015, Nebraska ranked sixth in the nation in volunteerism with nearly 34 percent of our population having reported volunteering.  Service is part of our heritage and continues to be a way of life.  I have every confidence we can reach our goal of being number one in 2017.  I want to thank the Nebraska150 Celebration and TD Ameritrade for working with ServeNebraska in such a meaningful way.”
The Nebraska150 Challenge
The Nebraska150 Challenge is an online fitness program that strives to make fitness fun by motivating and assisting Nebraskans to reach the goal of moving 150 miles or more in 2017.
Through an interactive website, www.ne150challenge.com, individuals and groups will register and document miles for walking, running, biking, swimming, kayaking, skateboarding, jump roping, or any type of exercise.  An online physical activity converter helps participants easily turn action into miles.  Participants will track their progress and earn virtual badges for at certain milestones.
The website features a social media feed; healthy living tips; links to the state’s hiking, biking, and kayaking trails; and information about marathons, walks, runs, and other organized amateur sporting events throughout the state.  The challenge is designed for every age and level of fitness.
The Nebraska150 Challenge is a partnership with the Nebraska Sports Council.
Nebraska Sports Council Executive Director Dave Mlnarik said, “The Nebraska Sports Council is proud to promote and provide staff support for the NE150 Challenge, which fits perfectly within our mission of encouraging healthy and active lifestyle choices.  We look forward to helping individuals, families, companies, colleges, K-12 classrooms, social groups, and others learn about and benefit from the Challenge.”
Now You Know Nebraska Videos
Now You Know Nebraska is a series of 174 engaging video shorts, each lasting one to two minutes, that will tell some of the state’s most compelling, entertaining, and appealing stories and facts, along with historical background to give context.  The videos were created by Lincoln-based production firm V2 Content and will be released on the Nebraska150 Celebration’s website, www.ne150.org/nowyouknow and via YouTube.
The primary goal of the project is to supplement the history lessons already being taught in the classroom and provide another engaging learning tool for educators.  Five videos will be released each Sunday beginning Jan. 8 so teachers are able to incorporate the content into the upcoming week’s lesson plans and so that differing schedules can be accommodated.  The videos will be accessible for the hearing impaired through closed captioning. 
Videos address a wide variety of topics and time periods, incorporate all parts of the state, and include education on a variety of cultures, ethnicities and races.  However, the video material will not simply repeat lessons already taught in the classroom.  
Shore said, “This has been an incredibly fun project to work on and we are excited for students across the state to see the final product.  Each video starts with a fascinating story or fact and then provides background, context, and detail, defining the significance of each topic. We did our best to sneak a lot of education into the fun with these videos.”
The Now You Know Nebraska video series is funded in part by Nebraska Humanities.
I Am Nebraska Oral History Project
I Am Nebraska is an oral history project, that invites citizens of all ages to share their Nebraska experience via social media by recording a short video and uploading it to their own Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram accounts under the hash tag “I Am Nebraska” (#IAMNEBRASKA).
The Nebraska150 Celebration will aggregate the submissions and feature some on its website, www.iamnebraska.com.  Participants can find instructions to produce their videos at those sites as well as watch sample videos produced by the Nebraska150 Celebration.
Shore said, “I Am Nebraska is a great school or family project.  I hope everyone in the state will tell their stories and that kids and students will interview older generations about their Nebraska experiences.  These invaluable stories will enable us to document our past and present in an engaging way for our future generations.  Best of all, this process will connect Nebraskans as they discover others’ stories. I believe we will quickly discover how wonderfully similar and unique our experiences are.
“You don’t have to be a professional videographer to participate.  All you need is a smartphone or webcam and Internet connection.  Tell us what living in Nebraska has meant to you.  Share your family history, favorite memories of growing up, the best Nebraska vacation experience how you have witnessed Nebraska change throughout the years, what you were surprised to discovered about the state after first moving here – whatever it is, we want to hear from you!” 
I Am Nebraska is funded in part by Nebraska Humanities and is a partnership with the Nebraska State Historical Society and the Nebraska Tourism Commission.  The storytelling campaign will work in tandem with the Tourism Commission’s efforts in 2017, encouraging Nebraskans to share their stories.
Additional information about the Nebraska150 Celebration is available at www.ne150.org on Facebook at facebook.com/nebraska150 and Twitter @ne150.
ABOUT THE 150 CELEBRATION
Planning for the Nebraska150 Celebration began in 2012 when a group of active citizens from across the state formed the Friends of the Nebraska150 Foundation.  In 2014, the Nebraska Sesquicentennial Commission was established by the Legislature and 17 members from across the state were appointed by the Governor to lead the initiative.  In 2015, the Celebrating Nebraska Statehood Foundation was established to help coordinate efforts and direct everyone toward collective success.

One Book, One Cozad Selects: Pioneer Girl: A True Story Of Growing Up On The Prairie

One Book, One Cozad  launches their third One Book, One Cozad program with the selection of Pioneer Girl: A True Story of Growing Up on the Prairie by Andrea Warren. Pioneer Girl is the story of Grace McCance Snyder based upon her memoir No Time on My Hands as well as additional information gathered by the author. In 1885, when she was three, Grace and her family became homesteaders outside of Cozad, Nebraska. Living together in a sod house, her family faced storms, fire, and drought. Grace’s story is woven among pages of the education, happiness and sadness of all homesteading children. 
The author, Andrea Warren, grew up in Newman Grove, Nebraska. Ms. Warren graduated from the University of Nebraska with a master’s degree in British Literature and taught high school English and history in Hastings before moving to Kansas to work as a newspaper reporter and freelance writer. Ms. Warren has written several highly acclaimed books including Orphan Train Rider: One Boy’s True Story, which won the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award for Outstanding Nonfiction and Surviving Hitler: A Boy in the Nazi Death Camps, a Robert F. Sibert Award Honor Book. Her most recent book, published in 2015, is entitled  The Boy Who Became Buffalo Bill: Growing Up Billy Cody in Bleeding Kansas. Regularly scheduled book discussions and events will be held monthly at the library for all interested persons beginning in February. The author will appear in several Nebraska libraries in April to make presentations about Pioneer Girl, including Cozad, Lexington, and Kearney. A special set of books will be set aside near the library’s circulation desk for all of 2017 for those wishing to check out the book. Additionally, a special tab at www.wilsonpubliclibrary.com will have information regarding up-coming events. Wilson Public Library is encouraging all local book clubs to thoughtfully consider adding Pioneer Girl: A True Story of Growing Up on the Prairie to their selection lists for 2017.    
The notion of a one book/one city (state, county, church, etc.) started with an idea by Seattle librarian Nancy Pearl. First initiated in 1998 by the Washington Center for the Book, the Library of Congress reports that such programs are abundant around the world. In fact, in 2017, One Book, One Nebraska will celebrate its twelfth year of a statewide program. Wilson Public Library agrees with the Nebraska Center for the Book’s philosophy that “reading great literature provokes us to think about ourselves, our environment and our relationships,” and that “talking about great literature with friends, families and neighbors often adds richness and depth to the experience of reading.”  

CNPPID Eagle Viewing Centers Currently Open

The eagle-viewing facility at the Johnson No. 2 (J-2) Hydroplant has been open to the public since December 23rd. 
Since the weekend holidays are over for the viewing season, the J-2 facility will be open on Saturdays and Sundays from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. (CDT) through at least the last weekend in February. The facility is located south of Lexington near the intersection of County Roads 749 and 750. Central’s second eagle-viewing facility is at Kingsley Dam near Ogallala. The freestanding building below the south end of the dam will be open and for the rest of the viewing season will follow the normal weekend schedule: open on Saturdays and Sundays from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. (MST) through the end of February.
A limited number of binoculars are available at the facilities, but visitors are encouraged to bring their own viewing equipment.
Central has been providing eagle-viewing opportunities at J-2 since 1988 and at Kingsley Dam since 1990. The eagles – as well as other wildlife — are attracted by the open water below the hydroplants, particularly when rivers and lakes in the area are covered with ice.
Several factors influence the number of eagles seen from the facilities on any given day, including climatic conditions, ice coverage on area bodies of water, the number of forage fish for feeding, how many eagles are wintering in the general area, and whether the hydroplants are on-line. The best viewing time is normally earlier in the day. There is no charge to visit either of the facilities.
For more information about eagles and viewing opportunities for groups, visit Central’s web page at www.cnppid.com or call (308) 995-8601.

Nebraska Veterans First To Hold Program in Lexington

Dick Pierce with Nebraska Veterans First will discuss what his organization is doing with the new Central Nebraska Veterans Home in Kearney during a session January 5th. The presentation will take place at the Lexington Public Library from 7 to 9 p.m.
Nebraska Veterans First is an organization managed by veterans and for veterans. The group wants our fellow veterans in the new Central Nebraska Veterans Home to have great quality of life and the group’s purpose is to raise awareness and funds to support their needs and welcome their families.
During the presentation, Pierce will talk about the progress on the construction at the home along with a Veterans Memorial, which will be built at the same location.

Eustis-Farnam Public School Honor Rolls

The Eustis/Farnam Public School has unveiled their honorees for the second quarter and semester that includes many students receiving excellent marks. 
Listed below are the honored students that achieved High Honor Roll and Honor Roll for the Second quarter as well as Semester: 
2nd Quarter 
High Honor Roll:
Seniors: Ashley Linke and 
Hayden Rupe. 
Juniors: Sammy Jack, Leigh-Anne Lehmann, Jacob Moore and Colton Thompson. 
Sophomores: Allie Portenier and Christian Timm.
Freshmen: Jacob Rupe.
Eighth Grade: Karissa Hodge and Maggie Walker.
Seventh Grade: Joszelyn Nichelson. 
Honor Roll:
Seniors: Mickayla Blender and Ali Jones. 
Juniors: Ayden Boller and Hannah Walker. 
Sophomores: Jonathon Bartell, Kimberlee Miller, Elizabeth Neukirch and Spencer Pleschourt. 
Freshmen: Andrew Jack.
Eighth Grade: Gretchen Hodge, Nathaniel Hodge, Zebulun Knackstedt and Faith Lee. 
First Semester
 High Honor Roll:
Seniors: Ashley Linke. 
Juniors: Sammy Jack, Leigh-Anne Lehmann, Jacob Moore, Colton Thompson and Hannah Walker. 
Sophomores: Allie Portenier and Christian Timm.
Freshmen: Jacob Rupe.
Eighth Grade: Karissa Hodge.
Seventh Grade: Joszelyn Nichelson. 
Honor Roll:
Seniors: Mickayla Blender,  Hayden Rupe and Ali Jones. 
Juniors: Ayden Boller.
Sophomores: Jonathon Bartell, Alexia Wilcox, Elizabeth Neukirch and Spencer Pleschourt. 
Freshmen: Andrew Jack and Syden Vyhlidal.
Eighth Grade: Gretchen Hodge, Nathaniel Hodge, Zebulun Knackstedt, Faith Lee and Maggie Walker.

Worrell Of Cozad Makes Impact Through Dance

A dance student with many accolades, Jordyn Worrell serves as a role model in the state for young dancers. Jordyn’s impact through dance in her school and community is why she is the Nebraskans for the Arts’ Student Spotlight in the Arts award winner.
Jordyn began dancing when she was three years old and loved it from the first time she stepped on the stage. She has worked hard over the past 15 years participating in dance classes and cheer and dance competitions. Jordyn won dance solo contests and has been part of three State Cheer Champions at Cozad. She was selected the Hixson-Lied College of Fine and Performing Arts’ Nebraska Young Artist Award Winner for Dance; Jordyn now attends the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.
It’s Jordyn’s positive impact on young girls that’s truly amazing, says her nominator, Nebraskans for the Arts board member, Tom Gosinski. “Jordyn has helped at the local dance studio, been an assistant teacher, and is a great role model for the younger girls she’s worked with.”
Jordyn believes the arts are an important resource for improving herself and others. "Performing has given me great confidence and taught me how to let my personality shine through. I was fortunate enough to help teach at my dance studio the past four years. My dance career also aided me in my cheerleading career, where I was able to choreograph two State Cheer Championship routines."Jord
In addition to her dance accolades, Jordyn was a Cozad High School Honor Roll Student, National Honor Society Member/Vice President, four year Cheerleader/Captain, seven year Student Congress/Council Member; Nebraska Family, Career and Community Leaders of America Officer, and performed lots of community service.

Cozad High STAND Students Attend No Limits Summit In Ashland

Teens from approximately a dozen Nebraska communities gathered in Ashland for hands-on training in anti-tobacco tactics at the No Limits Fall Summit Dec. 10–11 at the Carol Joy Holling Youth Camp. No Limits is Nebraska’s youth-led anti-tobacco movement for young people in grades 7–12. Summit sessions educate teens about ways tobacco companies target young people to become new customers. No Limits Youth Board member Tayte Jussel of O’Neill says the event helps young people gain leadership skills and make an impact in their communities. 
"The Fall Summit will help me take the fight to Big Tobacco in my own town. My plan is to do a project with Christmas lights to illustrate that 1,300 people die from tobacco-related causes in the United States every day,” said Jussel. “I will put the lights in a tree on Main Street of my town and make a poster under it that says each light bulb represents a life taken by Big Tobacco.”
Molly Kincaid, No Limits project coordinator, says the tobacco industry continues to release new products and packaging designed to appeal to youth. “We’re seeing more evidence that products like e-cigarettes can actually lead young people to smoke traditional cigarettes,” said Kincaid. “No Limits helps teens raise awareness of tobacco-related issues and help their peers resist marketing messages of Big Tobacco.” 

Vocalists Picked For Doane Honor Choir:

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CNPPID Eagle Viewing Centers Currently Open

Because Christmas and New Year’s Day fall on weekends, the eagle-viewing facility at the Johnson No. 2 (J-2) Hydroplant has been open to the public since December 23rd and will be on Friday, December 30th. The facility will not be open on Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day.
Following the holidays, the J-2 facility will be open on Saturdays and Sundays from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. (CDT) through at least the last weekend in February. The facility is located south of Lexington near the intersection of County Roads 749 and 750. Central’s second eagle-viewing facility is at Kingsley Dam near Ogallala. The freestanding building below the south end of the dam will open for the season on New Year's Eve, December 31st, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. It will not be open on New Year's Day, and then will follow the normal weekend schedule: open on Saturdays and Sundays from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. (MST) through the end of February.
A limited number of binoculars are available at the facilities, but visitors are encouraged to bring their own viewing equipment.
Central has been providing eagle-viewing opportunities at J-2 since 1988 and at Kingsley Dam since 1990. The eagles – as well as other wildlife — are attracted by the open water below the hydroplants, particularly when rivers and lakes in the area are covered with ice.
Several factors influence the number of eagles seen from the facilities on any given day, including climatic conditions, ice coverage on area bodies of water, the number of forage fish for feeding, how many eagles are wintering in the general area, and whether the hydroplants are on-line. The best
viewing time is normally earlier in the day. There is no charge to visit the
facilities.
For more information about eagles and viewing opportunities for groups, visit Central’s web page at www.cnppid.com or call (308) 995-8601.

First Bank & Trust Pays It Forward:

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First Baby Derbies Open In TRIBUNE-Area

The First Baby Derbies for 2017 will open at hospitals in Cozad, Gothenburg and Lexington at the stroke of 12 a.m. on Sunday, January 1st.
The family of the first arrival at the Cozad Community Hospital will receive a large array of gifts including:
BURGER KING: Two value meals
CORK ‘N’ CAP LIQUOR: Free bottle of wine
COZAD FLORAL & GIFTS: Free bud vase for Mom
DAIRY QUEEN: Two chicken strip baskets
FIRST BANK & TRUST CO.: $25 towards a Kids Club Savings Account
LICKY'S LUBE: Diaper Cake
PIZZA HUT: Large Pizza
RUNZA: $10 gift certificate
SONNY’S SUPER FOODS: $25 gift certificate
SEW Y’ KNOW: Baby blanket
TRACTOR SUPPLY: $20 gift certificate
TRI-CITY TRIB: One-year subscription
Watch the Tri-City Trib for announcement of all first babies born in Cozad, Gothenburg and Lexington.

Paying It Forward:

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HELPING FILL the shelves of the Cozad-Area Food Pantry were the employees of First Bank and Trust of Cozad with the proceeds from wearing jeans on Fridays. Individuals excited to participate in the venture were (from left) Clint Leffler, Sheri Hladky, Erin Buhring, Carmen Morse, Kathleen Garcia, Chuck Birgen, Julia Knauss, Kevin Gilbert, Jessica Beisner, Meggan Bowers, Brenda Lambert, Kirk Riley, Keri Stieb, Mandy Swanson, Renae Rowe and Gayln Olnhausen.

Kearney Cinema

  

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